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Pronunciation of Range: Learn how to pronounce Range in English correctly

Learn how to say Range correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word range:

noun
1the area of variation between upper and lower limits on a particular scale:
the cost will be in the range of $1-5 million a day
grand hotels were outside my price range
the scope of a person’s knowledge or abilities:
in this film he gave some indication of his range
the compass of a person’s voice or a musical instrument:
she was gifted with an incredible vocal range
the period of time covered by something such as a forecast.
the area covered by or included in something:
a guide to the range of debate this issue has generated
Mathematics the set of values that a given function can take as its argument varies.
2a set of different things of the same general type:
the area offers a wide range of activities for the tourist
the company’s new carpet range
3the distance within which a person can see or hear:
something lurked just beyond her range of vision
the maximum distance to which a gun will shoot or over which a missile will travel:
these rockets have a range of 30 to 40 miles
a duck came within range
the maximum distance at which a radio transmission can be effectively received:
planets within radio range of Earth
the distance that can be covered by a vehicle or aircraft without refuelling:
the vans have a range of 125 miles
the distance between a camera and the subject to be photographed:
handheld shots taken at extreme telephoto ranges can be pretty wobbly affairs
4a line or series of mountains or hills:
a mountain range
(ranges) Australian/NZ mountainous or hilly country:
no one would know if he had survived to live out his life in the ranges back from the river country
5a large area of open land for grazing or hunting:
on dude ranches, tourists put on crisp new western gear to ride the range
an area of land or sea used as a testing ground for military equipment:
the cost of dealing with unexploded shells and bombs on former military ranges
an open or enclosed area with targets for shooting practice:
he went down to the ranges to practise shooting
the area over which a plant or animal is distributed:
the chimpanzee extensively overlaps the gorilla in its forest range
6a large cooking stove with burners or hotplates and one or more ovens, all of which are kept continually hot:
a wood-burning kitchen range
North American an electric or gas cooker.
7a row of buildings:
Townesend’s Durham quadrangle range at Trinity College
a continuous stretch of a building.
8 [mass noun] archaic the direction or position in which something lies:
the range of the hills and valleys is nearly from north to south
verb
1 [no object, with adverbial] vary or extend between specified limits:
prices range from £30 to £100
2 [with object and adverbial] place or arrange in a row or rows or in a specified manner:
a table with half a dozen chairs ranged around it
[no object, with adverbial of direction] run or extend in a line in a particular direction:
he regularly came to the benches that ranged along the path
Printing, British (with reference to type) align or be aligned, especially at the ends of successive lines.
3 (range someone against or be ranged against) place oneself or be placed in opposition to (a person or group):
Japan ranged herself against the European nations
4 [no object, with adverbial of direction] (of a person or animal) travel or wander over a wide area:
patrols ranged deep into enemy territory
[with object]:
tribes who ranged the windswept lands of the steppe
(as adjective, in combination -ranging)
free-ranging groups of baboons
(of a person’s eyes) pass from one person or thing to another:
his eyes ranged over them
(of something written or spoken) cover a wide number of different topics:
tutorials ranged over a variety of subjects
5 [no object] obtain the range of a target by adjustment after firing past it or short of it, or by the use of radar or laser equipment:
radar-type transmissions which appeared to be ranging on our convoys
[with adverbial] (of a projectile) cover a specified distance.
[with adverbial] (of a gun) send a projectile over a specified distance.
Phrases

at a range of
with a specified distance between one person or thing and another:
she fired at a range of a few inches
Origin:

Middle English (in the sense ‘line of people or animals’): from Old French range ‘row, rank’, from rangier ‘put in order’, from rang ‘rank’. Early usage also included the notion of ‘movement over an area’