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Pronunciation of My Friends: Learn how to pronounce My Friends in English correctly

Learn how to say My Friends correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word friend:

noun
1a person with whom one has a bond of mutual affection, typically one exclusive of sexual or family relations:
she’s a friend of mine
we were close friends
(used as a polite form of address or in ironic reference) an acquaintance or a stranger one comes across:
my friends, let me introduce myself
(one’s friends) archaic one’s close relatives.
a person who supports a cause, organization, or country by giving financial or other help:
the Friends of the Welsh National Opera
a person who is not an enemy or opponent; an ally:
she was unsure whether he was friend or foe
a familiar or helpful thing:
he settled for that old friend the compensation grant
a contact on a social networking website:
all of a sudden you’ve got 50 friends online who need to stay connected
2 (Friend) a member of the Religious Society of Friends; a Quaker.
verb
[with object]
1 informal add (someone) to a list of friends or contacts on a social networking website:
I am friended by 29 people who I have not friended back
2 archaic befriend (someone).
[no object] (friend with) black English have a sexual relationship with:
the woman got married and you still used to friend with she?
Phrases

be (or make) friends with
be (or become) on good or affectionate terms with:
Carrie wanted to be friends with everyone
be no friend of (or to)
show no support or sympathy for:
he is no friend of the Republican Party
the policy revealed itself as no friend to the utilities
a friend at court
a person in a position to use their influence on one’s behalf:
I knew that it never hurt to have a friend at court
a friend in need is a friend indeed
proverb a person who helps at a difficult time is a person who you can really rely on:
you are a friend in need, you are, Edie
friend with benefits
informal a friend with whom one has an occasional and casual sexual relationship.
friends in high places
people in senior positions who are able and willing to use their influence on one’s behalf:
she had friends in high places everywhere
my honourable friend
British used to address or refer to another member of one’s own party in the House of Commons.
my learned friend
used by a barrister or solicitor in court to address or refer to another barrister or solicitor.
my noble friend
British used to address or refer to another member of one’s own party in the House of Lords.
my Right Honourable friend
British used to address or refer to another member of one’s own party in the House of Commons who is also a privy counsellor.
with friends like ——, who needs enemies?
used to suggest that a supposed friend or ally of a particular person has acted against the best interests of that person:
with friends like this guy, who needs enemies?
Origin:

Old English frēond, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vriend and German Freund, from an Indo-European root meaning ‘to love’, shared by free