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Pronunciation of Liberalistic: Learn how to pronounce Liberalistic in English correctly

Learn how to say Liberalistic correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word liberal:

adjective
1willing to respect or accept behaviour or opinions different from one’s own; open to new ideas:
liberal views towards divorce
favourable to or respectful of individual rights and freedoms:
liberal citizenship laws
(in a political context) favouring individual liberty, free trade, and moderate political and social reform:
a liberal democratic state
(Liberal) relating to Liberals or a Liberal Party, especially (in the UK) relating to the Liberal Democrat party:
the Liberal leader
Theology regarding many traditional beliefs as dispensable, invalidated by modern thought, or liable to change.
2 [attributive] (of education) concerned with broadening a person’s general knowledge and experience, rather than with technical or professional training:
the provision of liberal adult education
3(especially of an interpretation of a law) broadly construed or understood; not strictly literal:
they could have given the 1968 Act a more liberal interpretation
4given, used, or occurring in generous amounts:
liberal amounts of wine had been consumed
(of a person) giving generously:
Sam was too liberal with the wine
noun
a person of liberal views:
a concern among liberals about the relation of the citizen to the state
(Liberal) a supporter or member of a Liberal Party, especially (in the UK) a Liberal Democrat.
Derivatives
liberalism
noun
liberalist
noun
liberalistic
Pronunciation: /-ˈlɪstɪk/
adjective
liberally
adverb
liberalness
noun
Origin:
Middle English: via Old French from Latin liberalis, from liber ‘free (man)’. The original sense was ‘suitable for a free man’, hence ‘suitable for a gentleman’ (one not tied to a trade), surviving in liberal arts. Another early sense ‘generous’ (compare with sense 4 of the adjective) gave rise to an obsolete meaning ‘free from restraint’, leading to sense 1 of the adjective (late 18th century)