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Pronunciation of Coded: Learn how to pronounce Coded in English correctly

Learn how to say Coded correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word code:

noun
1a system of words, letters, figures, or symbols used to represent others, especially for the purposes of secrecy:
the Americans cracked their diplomatic code
[mass noun]:
messages written in code
a phrase or concept used to represent another in an indirect way:
researching ‘the family’ is usually a code for studying women
a series of letters, numbers, or symbols assigned to something for the purposes of classification or identification:
each box had a label with the code SC 90
short for dialling code.
I was given the number, but not the code for Guildford
2 [mass noun] Computing program instructions:
assembly code
3a systematic collection of laws or statutes:
a revision of the penal code
a set of conventions or moral principles governing behaviour in a particular sphere:
a strict dress code
a stern code of honour
verb
[with object]
1convert (the words of a message) into a code so as to convey a secret meaning:
only Mitch knew how to read the message—even the name was coded
express the meaning of (a statement) in an indirect way:
(as adjective coded)
journalists made coded allusions to his deficiencies
assign a code to (something) for purposes of classification or identification:
she coded the samples and sent them for dissection
2write code for (a computer program).
3 [no object] (code for) Biochemistry be the genetic code for (an amino acid or protein):
genes that code for human growth hormone
be the genetic determiner of (a characteristic):
one pair of homologous chromosomes codes for eye colour
Phrases

bring something up to code

North American renovate or update an old building in line with the latest building regulations:
the wiring will be brought up to code
Derivatives

coder

noun
Origin:

Middle English: via Old French from Latin codex, codic- (see codex). The term originally denoted a systematic collection of statutes made by Justinian or another of the later Roman emperors; compare with code (sense 3 of the noun) (mid 18th century), the earliest modern sense