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Pronunciation of Chased: Learn how to pronounce Chased in English correctly

Learn how to say Chased correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word chase:

verb
[with object]
1pursue in order to catch or catch up with:
police chased the stolen car through the city
[no object]:
the dog chased after the stick
seek to attain:
the team are chasing their first home win this season
seek the company of (a member of the opposite sex) in an obvious way:
he spends all his free time chasing girls
2 [with object and adverbial of direction] drive or cause to go in a specified direction:
she chased him out of the house
[no object, with adverbial of direction] rush in a specified direction:
he chased down the motorway
3try to obtain (something owed or required):
the company employs people to chase up debts
try to make contact with (someone) in order to obtain something owed or required:
the council recently appointed its own team of bailiffs to chase non-payers
(chase something up (or US down)) make further investigation of an unresolved matter.
noun
an act of pursuing someone or something:
they captured the youths after a brief chase
short for steeplechase.
(the chase) hunting as a sport:
she was an ardent follower of the chase
[in place names] British an area of unenclosed land formerly reserved for hunting:
Cannock Chase
archaic a hunted animal.
Phrases
chase the game
(in soccer) adopt attacking tactics, especially when losing, at the risk of being vulnerable to counter-attack:
we made the mistake of trying to chase the game instead of playing it tight
chase shadows
pursue illusory targets:
I found that the three-day mission did little more than chase shadows
give chase
go in pursuit:
a patrol car gave chase and finally overtook him
officers gave chase to one of the thieves
go and chase oneself
[in imperative] informal go away.
the thrill of the chase
see thrill.
Origin:
Middle English: from Old French chacier (verb), chace (noun), based on Latin captare ‘continue to take’, from capere ‘take’