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Pronunciation of Card: Learn how to pronounce Card in English correctly

Learn how to say Card correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word card:

noun
1a piece of thick, stiff paper or thin pasteboard, in particular one used for writing or printing on:
some notes jotted down on a card
[mass noun]:
a piece of card
a card printed with a picture and used to send a message or greeting:
a birthday card
a card with a person’s name and other details printed on it for purposes of identification, for example a business card:
a membership card entitled you to library services
she dug into her bag and produced her card
(in soccer and some other games) a yellow or red card shown by the referee to a player who is being cautioned or sent off:
the ref will have his cards at the ready to enforce the rule of law
2a small rectangular piece of plastic containing personal data in a machine-readable form and used to obtain cash or credit or to pay for a telephone call, gain entry to a room or building, etc.:
your card cannot be used to withdraw more than your daily limit from cash machines
she paid for the goods with her card
3a playing card:
a pack of cards
(cards) a game played with playing cards:
they were playing interminable cards
4 Computingshort for expansion card.
5 (cards) British informal documents relating to an employee, especially for tax and national insurance, held by the employer.
6a programme of events at a race meeting:
a nine-race card
a record of scores in a sporting event; a scorecard.
7 informal, dated a person regarded as odd or amusing:
He laughed: ‘You’re a card, you know’
verb
[with object]
1write (something) on a card, especially for indexing.
informal (in golf and other sports) score (a certain number of points on a scorecard):
he carded 68 in the final round
(of the referee in soccer and some other games) show a yellow or red card to (a player who is being cautioned or sent off):
Reid, seconds after being carded, broke down the left wing
a Mac flanker was carded and sent to the sin bin in the first half
2North American check the identity card of (someone), in particular as evidence of legal drinking age:
we were carded at the entrance to the club
3 (be carded) Canadian (of an amateur athlete) be in receipt of government funding to pursue training:
in 1986-7 all carded athletes received a basic $450 monthly allowance
Phrases
a card up one’s sleeve
a plan or asset that is kept secret until it is needed:
the alliances have been the key card up our sleeve
get one’s cards
British informal be dismissed from one’s employment:
he got his cards on his 50th birthday
give someone their cards
British informal dismiss someone from employment:
the firm has just given 74,000 workers their cards
hold all the cards
be in a very strong or advantageous position:
he held all the cards and made all the decisions
on (or North American in) the cards
British informal possible or likely:
our marriage has been on the cards from day one
play (or use) the —— card
exploit the specified issue or idea mentioned, especially for political advantage:
he resisted the temptation to play the race card
the government tried to play the nationalist card
play one’s cards right
make the best use of one’s assets and opportunities:
you have a chance of success if you play your cards right
put (or lay) one’s cards on the table
be completely open and honest in declaring one’s resources, intentions, or attitude:
I would have a confrontation with him and put my cards on the table
Origin:
late Middle English (in sense 3 of the noun): from Old French carte, from Latin carta, charta, from Greek khartēs ‘papyrus leaf’