Posted on

Pronunciation of After All: Learn how to pronounce After All in English correctly

Learn how to say After All correctly in English with this tutorial pronunciation video.

Oxford dictionary definition of the word after:

preposition
1in the time following (an event or another period of time):
shortly after their marriage they moved to Colorado
after a while he returned
he’d gone out with his secretary for an after-work drink
in phrases indicating something happening continuously or repeatedly:
day after day we kept studying
North American past (used in specifying a time):
I strolled in about ten minutes after two
during the time following the departure or action of:
she cooks for him and cleans up after him
2behind:
she went out, shutting the door after her
(with reference to looking or speaking) in the direction of someone who is moving further away:
she stared after him
3in pursuit or quest of:
chasing after something you can’t have
4next to and following in order or importance:
in their order of priorities health comes after housing
5in allusion to (someone or something with the same or a related name):
they named her Pauline, after Barbara’s mother
in imitation of:
a drawing after Millet’s The Reapers
conjunction & adverb
during the period of time following (an event):
[as conjunction]:
bath-time ended in a flood after the taps were left running
[as adverb]:
Duke Frederick died soon after
adjective
[attributive]
1 archaic later:
he was sorry in after years
2nearer the stern of a ship:
the after cabin
Phrases
after all
in spite of any indications or expectations to the contrary:
I rang and told her I couldn’t come after all
after hours
after normal working or licensed opening hours:
[as adverb]:
she was going in to work after hours
[as adjective]:
an after-hours jazz club
after you
a polite formula used to suggest that someone goes in front of or takes a turn before oneself.
be after doing something
Irish be on the point of doing something or have just done it:
the pigs were after breaking loose
Origin:
Old English æfter, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch achter